SCUM

Matt. 16. MA.

The Doors - Light My Fire

The Doors - Light My Fire

(Source: 50sand60smusic, via marlbororeds100s)

CrucialXMatt looks like a hotdog reblog this if you dont know what i am talking about

I LIVE A HARD ASS LIFE LOOKIN LIKE A FLAPPY MEAT STICK YOU DONT EVEN KNOW MY STRUGGLE. YOU HAVE A PERFECT JAW LINE ALL I HAVE IS A FLAPPY HOT DOG BODY

(Source: robertxemerik)

marlbororeds100s:

Toma puto

marlbororeds100s:

Toma puto

(Source: elcilantroo)

sufferinproxy:

black—earth:

http://black—earth.tumblr.com/
ratpacknyc:

Underdog - Vanishing Point - Caroline Records

ratpacknyc:

Underdog - Vanishing Point - Caroline Records

(via robertxemerik)

Black Flag - Fix Me

marlbororeds100s:

jenntrilla:

Someday I’ll feel no pain
Someday I won’t have a brain
They’ll take away the part that hurts
And let the rest remain

Fix me
Fix my head
Fix me please,
I don’t wanna be dead

Fix it!

I remember when rotting out opened with this song two years ago.

ryden-gg:

this video must be seen

(Source: annieackermann)

(Source: ratpacknyc, via rebelxgrrrl)

brucesterling:

UFO typologies, 1967

brucesterling:

UFO typologies, 1967

(via photosynthelys)

thronesturnedtorust:

United Youth / Disengage -  ”live split”

thronesturnedtorust:

United Youth / Disengage -  ”live split”

(via raisethedevilinthevalley)

andrewfishman:

Ai Weiwei, “Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn,” 1995
An astonishingly irreverent piece of work.  This triptych features the artist dropping a Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD) in three photographs.  
When questioned about the work, he suggested that the piece was about industry: “[The urn] was industry then and is industry now.”  His statement, therefore, was that the urn was just a cheap pot two thousand years ago, and the reverence we feel toward it is artificial.  One critic wrote: “In other words, for all the aura of preciousness acquired by the accretion of time (and skillful marketing), this vessel is the Iron Age equivalent of a flower pot from K-Mart and if one were to smash the latter a few millennia from now, would it be an occasion for tears?”
However, the not-so-subtle political undertone is clear.  This piece was about destroying the notion that everything that is old is good…including the traditions and cultures of China.  For Ai Weiwei, this triptych represents a moment in which culture suddenly shifts (sometimes violently), shattering the old and outdated to make room for the new.  

andrewfishman:

Ai Weiwei, “Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn,” 1995

An astonishingly irreverent piece of work.  This triptych features the artist dropping a Han Dynasty (206 BC - 220 AD) in three photographs.  

When questioned about the work, he suggested that the piece was about industry: “[The urn] was industry then and is industry now.”  His statement, therefore, was that the urn was just a cheap pot two thousand years ago, and the reverence we feel toward it is artificial.  One critic wrote: “In other words, for all the aura of preciousness acquired by the accretion of time (and skillful marketing), this vessel is the Iron Age equivalent of a flower pot from K-Mart and if one were to smash the latter a few millennia from now, would it be an occasion for tears?”

However, the not-so-subtle political undertone is clear.  This piece was about destroying the notion that everything that is old is good…including the traditions and cultures of China.  For Ai Weiwei, this triptych represents a moment in which culture suddenly shifts (sometimes violently), shattering the old and outdated to make room for the new.  

(via turndown4who)

sirimpooopy:

asolitarycomfort:

Ai Weiwei

this series is amazing

(via wallyedge)